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Sewer line issues: Here are the signs of a cracked or clogged line

Okay, let’s be honest: your sewer line is probably one of those things in your home that you don’t really think much about… until something goes wrong. But, what does something going “wrong” even entail with a sewer line? What do you even look for?

In this blog post, we’ll break down both the causes of sewer line woes and the signs you need to look out for to indicate that you need plumbing repair.

If your home has a sewer line clog, our plumbers can clear out the line using an auger, like the one pictured here.

If your home has a sewer line clog, our plumbers can clear out the line using an auger, like the one pictured here.

If you suspect that your Bay Area home has sewer line issues, contact our team here at ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing. We offer emergency line inspection and repair services in Hayward and beyond. To get started, give us a call at (510) 471-8181 or contact us online.

Causes of sewer line issues

Here are three of the most common causes of sewer line problems:

  1. Your sewer line can clog if the line is obstructed by what’s popularly known as a “grease-berg”. This is a collection of grease, oils, fats, and other material—typically poured down the kitchen sink—that collects in a physical mass, until it eventually clogs the entire 6-inch line. (Read: Here’s an example of what this looks like on a larger scale!)
  2. Your sewer line can also clog if obstructed by trash. This is why it’s not recommended that you throw anything that isn’t biodegradable down the kitchen sink or toilet. We’ve seen q-tips form the basis for a major clog!
  3. Your sewer line can crack if a tree root—searching for water—breaks into the pipe and begins to fill it. More on this in a minute!

To learn even more about the common causes of sewer line clogs—and how you can potentially prevent a clog from forming—check out this blog from our team.

4 Signs Of Sewer Line Problems

Here are the four big signs of sewer line troubles:

Simultaneous drain clogging

Think of your home’s plumbing like a river that is fed by multiple smaller streams. If you were to dam one of those creeks, it might not impact the larger river all that much, and the river would continue to flow downstream.

Pictured: Sewer Line Repair

This is what removing and repairing a ceramic sewer line looks like.

However, if you dammed the large river, the water from the entire system would have nowhere to go, and would start to rise above the banks. What’s more, that water would get pushed back into the creeks, and they’d flood, too.

A single clogged sink or kitchen drain is like the stream in the analogy. You might need our drain cleaning services, but it probably doesn’t mean you have a sewer line clog.

A sewer line clog or blockage is the damming of the river, in that your entire home’s plumbing is going to backup. If the line clogs, all of the drains in your home will clog simultaneously. That’s when you need to drop everything and give us a call for emergency plumbing repair.

Wet ground above the line

A cracked sewer line that leaks can be a major problem. Before we get started, think about the answers to the following:

  • When was your home built? If your home was built in the 1980s or later, it likely has a PVC sewer line. PVC can crack or collapse when put under pressure (more on that in a second), but with no outside duress, it should last for the lifetime of the home. Older materials—such as cast-iron or clay—are durable, but don’t have quite the lifespan of PVC.
  • Where does your line run? Find your sewer cleanout lines and determine where the sewer line runs from your home to the municipal sewer. For many homes, the line runs to the street.
  • What’s above the line? Now that you know where the line runs, what’s above it? Take note of any trees, bushes, or other yard foliage.

Trace the sewer line’s location and look for any abnormal “wet” spots on the ground, when there has been no rain and there’s no irrigation for water to pool there. If it’s right above the line, this may be a sign that your sewer line has a leak.

Trees or bushes above the line

If there’s a tree or bush right above or near the line, you should be extra wary. Over time, tree roots dig deep in search of water. Roots can destroy or block sewer lines even without a leak, but a sewer leak acts as a positive feedback loop for the tree. As they find water, the roots snarl around the line, breaking into it.

Tree roots are a common cause of sewer line clogs here in the Bay Area. Even a tree that’s feet away from the line can have roots that find their way to it.

Sewer odors outside and inside

If you step outside and your yard smells like a garbage heap, that’s a pretty good sign that something is wrong. A cracked line will emit sewer gases, which smell about as great as you might assume.

Sewer smells inside the home could indicate the same problem, or they could indicate that the sewer trap plugs aren’t doing their job. Either way, we recommend giving us a call. We’ll diagnose whether you need your traps fixed, or if the issue is more serious.

Schedule a sewer inspection

All of the signs above are good indicators that something is wrong with your sewer line. However, the only way to be 100% sure that’s there a blockage—and to know what exactly is causing it—is to schedule a sewer line inspection from our team here at ABC.

The best way to see a clog is to, well, actually see it. We have specialized cameras that we place on lines to go into the line and identify the problem before digging things up. Depending on the type of clog, there may be a way to clear it without opening up the line.

For service in the Bay Area, turn to the experts at ABC

At ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing, we know our way around sewer lines and the problems homeowners face. Our experienced, expert plumbers are plumbing repair experts, and we offer emergency service in much of the Bay Area, including Hayward and the East Bay.

If you need emergency service or you need a sewer camera inspection, give us a call at (510) 471-8181 or contact us online.

Everything you need to know about sewer line clogs

Your sewer line carries wastewater away from the sinks, toilets, and showers of your home. It travels underneath your yard to the street, where it connects to the municipal sewer. Most homeowners don’t give their sewer line much thought: beyond the fact that the entire operation of waste disposal is a bit unsavory to think about, the sewer line also fulfills its important function without much issue.

However, when problems do occur, the results can be disastrous. A sewer line clog can lead to sewage and wastewater backing up into your home. Known as a sewer backup, this event is a homeowner’s worst nightmare.

In this article, we’ll provide a complete guide to sewer lines, the issues they can encounter, and how you can prevent a sewer backup in your own home.

We’re your sewer line experts

At ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing, our team specializes in sewer line inspection and repair. Our team of plumbing professionals has the tools and expertise needed to quickly diagnose issues with the sewer line and then recommend the right fix. We also fix storm drain issues.

Since 1953, homeowners in Hayward and the Bay Area have trusted our team with all their home service needs, and we’re proud to continue that tradition of great service into the present day.

Need a sewer inspection or repair here in Hayward, San Leandro, Union City, or surrounding areas? Fill out the form to schedule service with our team.

Common causes of a sewer line clog

Tree Roots

Many sewer line clogs have their roots in, well, roots. The sewer line runs from your home to the street, often passing under a front or side yard. Any nearby trees, bushes, or shrubs are a potential danger to the line. Over time, their thirsty, moisture-seeking roots will burrow down to the line, where they either enter it through an existing crack or put enough pressure on the line’s exterior to crack it open.

As the roots attempt to take in more and more moisture, they eventually grow into the line, partially—and then fully—obstructing it. This leads to a sewer line blockage and the high risk of a sewer backup.

If you have trees in your front yard, you should be aware of the threat they may pose to your home's sewer line.

If you have trees in your front yard, you should be aware of the threat they may pose to your home’s sewer line.

What types of trees pose the biggest threat?

Any tree within 10 feet of the line is a potential threat. Some tree species have faster-growing roots than others, making them more dangerous to the sewer line than others:

Less Dangerous

These trees have slow-growing, less aggressive root structures, and can be planted 10 feet away from the sewer line.

  • Maple species
  • Dogwood species
  • Crabapple trees
  • Ginkgo trees
  • Smoke trees

More Dangerous

These trees have fast-growing, aggressive root structures, and should not be planted near sewer lines.

  • Ash species
  • Poplar species
  • Cottonwood species
  • Oak species
  • Sycamore species

How can tree root incursion be prevented?

  • Plant all new trees, bushes, and shrubs at least 10 feet away from the sewer line on all sides.
  • If you have existing trees near the sewer line, consider having them moved to another part of your yard as a preventative measure.
  • When planting a slow-growing tree, plan on replacing or moving the tree in the next 15-20 years.
  • If you are planting a fast-growing tree, plan on replacing or moving the tree in the next 8-10 years. Depending on the species, this is typically representative of how long it takes its roots to expand the distance to the sewer line.

Grease & Waste

Many homeowners don’t give much thought to how they use their garbage disposal, or what they put down it. However, just how you dispose of kitchen waste can have a big impact on your home’s sewer line.

In general, the most dangerous thing to put down the sink is anything that is a liquid while hot but solidifies upon cooling.

An ABC plumber cleans out a sewer line clog at a local home.Grease

Grease is the most famous example of this. The homeowner pours hot cooking grease down the drain. As the grease travels through pipes, it begins to cool. By the time it reaches the sewer line, it may be much cooler than it originally was, and begins to solidify with the temperature change. This partially solidified grease sticks to the interior of the line. Time after time, disposing of grease in this way adds to the building blockage in the line. Eventually, it’s enough for a clog to start to form.

Food Waste

It’s not just grease that’s a problem. Here is some food waste that you should never dispose of down the sink drain:

  • Coffee Grounds: Besides grease, coffee grounds are the number one cause of sewer line blockages. These grounds can become stuck in pipes when they adhere to other materials deep inside of the line.
  • Eggshells: As the shells fracture in the garbage disposal, tiny pieces of shell shrapnel travel down the lines and become stuck in the sewer line.
  • Oil & Butter: This is essentially the same story as grease: fats and oils can coat the inside of the line and congeal deep inside of it. While it is a kitchen staple, coconut oil is especially dangerous, since it solidifies at room temperature.
  • Rice & Pasta: Anything that physically expands upon continued contact with water is bad news once in your sewer line. A half-cup of uncooked rice can bloat to a sewer line-blocking mess once exposed to water.
  • Flour: When combined with water, most flours become sticky and adhesive. This is not something you want inside of your sewer line.

Bathroom Waste

Inorganic bathroom waste is a major cause of sewer line issues. Just because something can be flushed down the toilet doesn’t mean that it should be. Avoid putting non-biodegradable items down the toilet drain. A few common examples include human hair, sanitary products, plastics, baby wipes, or flushable wipes. That latter one is a common misunderstanding: despite what their marketing says, ‘flushable’ wipes are not actually flushable and can cause a clog.

Sagging Sewer Line

Your sewer line does not use electricity or gas to move wastewater from one place (your home) to another (the municipal sewer). Instead, it accomplishes this by using gravity. The sewer line is slightly sloped diagonally so that the end at your home is several inches higher than the end at the street. This helps facilitate the movement of water from one location to another. In most cases, this gradient is very gradual: about a one-fourth of an inch drop for every foot of pipe length.

The Sewer Line “Belly”

No matter how perfectly installed the sewer line was originally, there are some potential problems that can crop up as time goes by. First, the movement of soil around the line. Throughout the year, soil can shift and move due to changes in moisture and local topographic factors. As it does, the line moves, too. If a certain patch of soil sinks, the line also sinks. This can cause a “u” shape to start to form, disrupting the gravity-assisted flow of water out of the system.

This is often known as a sewer line “belly,” and it can cause several issues. First, it creates a place in the line where wastewater gets perpetually stuck and pools. This can lead to foul odors as not all the waste is being discharged from the line. Second, if the wastewater can no longer “climb” back up the other side of the “u,” it may eventually start to back up the line and back into the house.

Dealing with a sagging sewer line

Generally speaking, there are two ways to fix a sagging sewer line. The first is relatively self-explanatory: the plumber digs up the sewer line and fixes the sag, either by replacing that section of line or by restoring it to its original position. However, this requires digging a trench in your yard to get to the line, and may not be practical for every home. Plumbers have two other options in such cases:

  • Guidance Method: Using this method, the plumber pushes the old pipe out using the new pipes and compacts the soil around it as they go, maintaining the slope.
  • Sliplining: The plumber inserts a smaller sewer line into the current one, and then pulls away the old line. The only downside of this method is that the smaller diameter of the new sewer line may be easier to clog in the future.

Schedule a camera inspection

The best way to diagnose sewer line clogs, leaks, and other issues is by using a sewer line camera tool. Most plumbing professionals—including ours here at ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing—have specialized snake tools that allow us to feed a small camera down the drain and into the line. As the camera moves through the line, we can see any points of trouble and any partially formed clogs.

If you have reason to believe that your sewer line is experiencing issues, a sewer line inspection is the next step. Talk to your local plumbing professional about scheduling a camera inspection.

Warning signs of a sewer line blockage

There are many potential warning signs of a sewer line clog or leak. Here are the two that you need to be on the lookout for in your home:

Simultaneous clogging

When a single drain pipe in your home is clogged, you’ll notice that the sink is backing up, the toilet won’t flush, or the shower basin is starting to flood. This is a pretty regular occurrence, and—in most cases—the problem can be solved locally by running the garbage disposal, plunging the toilet, or cleaning out the shower drain.

However, if all the drains and toilets in your home are clogged at the same time, this is almost as sure a sign as any that something is wrong deep inside of the sewer line. You should immediately turn the water off and call a plumber for service.

Slow-moving drains

Not every sewer line clog starts as a complete and total blockage. In most cases, sewer line clogs are first noticed when they only partially block the line. You’ll start to see your drains draining more and more slowly as this happens.

Call ABC for help clearing a sewer line clog

The above are the most common reasons for a residential sewer line clog. You should contact the licensed and certified plumbers at ABC to come and diagnose the exact reason for a clog. After assessing the reason for, and the location of, the clog, our plumber will use professional tools to efficiently get your sewer system working again.

In case you reside in San Jose, Hayward, or the surrounding locations in much of the Bay Area, you should contact our team for expert help for sewer line clogs. Our professional plumbers will quickly diagnose the problem and resolve any issues with your home plumbing.

How to properly shut down your furnace after winter

For most U.S. homeowners, the official end of winter comes when they switch their thermostat from its “heating” setting to either the “off” or “cooling” one. As everything thaws out in the spring, the days start getting longer and the nights become warmer. The home’s furnace—once essential to indoor comfort—is no longer to be used until the following fall and winter. However, that’s not the end of the story. Few homeowners know this, but you actually can—and should—shut down the furnace itself after winter. In this article, we’ll review the reasons why a furnace shutdown is necessary, the benefits of doing so, and how you can keep your furnace in great condition throughout the calendar year.

What is a furnace shutdown?

Surprisingly, many U.S. homeowners leave their furnaces running throughout the calendar year. Seasonal furnace shutdown tends to be a home maintenance item that gets left behind in the busy days of spring. While modern furnaces can be left on year-round without any significant safety or mechanical issues, you have the potential to save energy by shutting it off. This applies to both gas and electric furnaces.

Have an ABC technician shut down your furnace after winter.Shutting down a gas furnace

Most natural gas furnaces have a standing pilot light that requires a steady flow of some gas to keep lit. While the natural gas use for the pilot may seem minuscule, it can really add up: most homeowners waste about $50 every year keeping the furnace pilot light running during the off-season. Add up those costs through successive years, and you could save hundreds by just making a small change to your spring cleaning checklist.

To shut down your gas furnace, turn off the gas valve supplying fuel to the system and its pilot light. You should see the pilot go out. Make sure you leave a note reminding yourself to turn the gas back on in the fall so that your heating system can get back to work heating your home.

Shutting down an electric furnace

As with all the electric appliances in your home, electric furnaces continue to draw power even when they are not in use. Sometimes referred to as “vampire appliances,” this passive energy use can sap your home’s energy efficiency and spike your energy bills. In the context of your electric furnace, you can avoid this by shutting off power to the circuit the furnace is on. Just double-check that nothing else is on that circuit that you might need.

Caring for your furnace after the winter months

Besides shutting the system off, there are several things you can do to care for your furnace in the spring:

Clean the area around the furnace

If you’re like many American homeowners who have their furnace in the basement, a storage closet, or garage, you’ve probably been tempted to store things next to it or near it. However, this is not recommended. Here are a few reasons why:

  • Fire Hazard: For obvious reasons, anything flammable should be kept away from the furnace. Leave at least two feet of space between the furnace and any stored objects, and keep ignitable materials—such as paint, oils, rags, cardboard boxes, clothes, or wood stain—away from the general vicinity.
  • Airflow: Your furnace requires air intake and outflow to work properly. Putting too many objects around the furnace can restrict this airflow, leading to efficiency, performance, and functionality problems.
  • Filter: Add vacuuming around the furnace to your spring cleaning to-do list. If the area around your furnace is full of dust, dirt, or lint, the furnace’s intake filter is going to become dirty faster. Any lint build-up—common in homes where the furnace is next to laundry machines in a basement or closet—can also present a fire hazard.

Check your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors

Wherever your furnace is, you should have a properly working smoke and carbon monoxide detector. While rare, a crack in the furnace heat exchanger or flue pipe could lead to the leakage of dangerous carbon monoxide gas into the home. Also known as “the silent killer,” carbon monoxide is a toxic gas that is colorless and odorless, making it difficult for humans to detect on their own. That’s why a working carbon monoxide detector is critical. Be sure to check the batteries and test the device every spring.

If you have reason to believe that something is wrong with your furnace or that you have a potential carbon monoxide leak, turn the system off and call an HVAC professional immediately.

Inspect the air registers

Take a walk around your home this spring and check out all the air supply and return registers. After a long winter of use, they may be getting pretty dusty. While you’re dusting the rest of your home, use a stepladder to clean these out thoroughly. This helps ensure that both your air conditioner and furnace are getting the air intake they need to function properly.

Another note: if you want to maximize the energy efficiency of your home, avoid keeping multiple registers closed in different rooms. This might seem counterintuitive: after all, doesn’t it make sense to shut off the flow of cold or hot air if you’re not using that room? However, in a whole-home forced-air setup, your furnace and air conditioner work to cool or heat the entire home. That heated or cooled air is still being pushed through the air duct to that closed register, so all you’re doing is making it more difficult for the system to make your home comfortable.

In fact, in most homes, it’s most efficient for the registers and doors to each room to be open.

Schedule your fall maintenance appointment

While the furnace is on your mind, you should take the time to call your local HVAC company and schedule a fall maintenance appointment. For most cooling and heating companies, annual tune-up appointment slots tend to fill up fast in the fall, as people call last-minute to schedule service. By calling in the spring, you can be one of the first to reserve your spot, ensuring that your gas or electric furnace gets looked at before the weather cools down.

While you’re on the phone, be sure to ask the HVAC team if they offer any kind of maintenance club or program to their customers. These recurring maintenance programs take the hassle out of having to remember to schedule annual tune-ups. Plus, most companies offer additional benefits as a ‘thank you’ for enrolling.

Here at ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing, for instance, our Guardian Maintenance Club members get a call from our team to schedule their fall tune-up and we provide them with priority service, a service discount, and a 90-day no-breakdown guarantee on top of it!

For all your furnace shutdown and service needs, call in an expert

No two homes are quite the same. If you want service advice and furnace shutdown guidance tailored to your home and your heating system, our recommendation is that you contact a local HVAC service professional in your area. They will be able to walk you through the shutdown process and advise you on how to best prepare your air conditioner for the warmer weather ahead—which will include a seasonal tune-up.

Here in Hayward and the Bay Area, ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing is your trusted team for furnace maintenance services. For all your heating needs, call us today.

Make the switch to a new demand-type water heater

If you are considering a water heater replacement, you should think about the numerous demand-type water heater advantages you can benefit from. If you are not considering a replacement, perhaps you should be.

In this blog, we’ll run through the advantages of switching to a new tankless system. To get started, contact our team.

Is it time to replace your old water heater?

How can you know if you need to replace your water heater? Here are some important indicators:

  • Your current water heater is 10 or more years old.
  • Your energy bill has gone up without significantly increased use.
  • Your hot water supply runs out more quickly than it used to.
  • There is visible damage to the water tank, such as a crack.

If any one or more of these things is true for you, a new water heater would be a wise investment in the near future, and ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing is here to help you make the transition.

The advantages of going tankless

If you haven’t already made the switch to a tankless water heater, now is the time to do it. Instead of storing hot water in a tank that must refill itself before use after it is emptied, tankless water heaters provide hot water continuously, heating the water as it flows. You won’t run out of hot water, even when multiple people are using it at once.

Here are some other demand-type water heater advantages for you to consider:

  • Fewer risks to your home – A tank in an old water heater can experience malfunctions or sustain damage that can lead to flooding or other problems in your home. Tankless water heaters have no tank to burst, and don’t endure the massive amounts of water pressure that can lead to issues.
  • Savings on your energy bill – Tankless water heaters are far more energy-efficient, which means you won’t need to spend as much money heating the same amount of water. In fact, you could cut your bill by more than 20 percent!
  • Longer-lasting equipment – Demand-type water heaters have roughly twice the lifespan of a water heater with a tank. They also have many replaceable parts, so repairs are easier and cost less.

Call ABC to learn more about a demand-type water heater

At ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing, we understand your desire to make the best decisions for your home, family, and finances. With our services, we offer fair pricing and full satisfaction to all our customers.

If you’re ready to upgrade your old water heater to a new demand-type system, contact us today for a quote.

Oil vs Gas Furnace: Which is Better for Your Home

Oil vs Gas FurnaceA furnace is a great blessing in areas where the temperature dips into single digits during the winters. Okay, that may not describe the Bay Area. But a properly functional oil or gas furnace ensures that homeowners have a pleasant time inside the house during the winter.

When it comes to buying a furnace, one important point that comes to the mind of most homeowners is whether to go for an oil or gas furnace.

Choosing between gas or oil furnace is not just about cost. The reality is that oil furnaces deliver more heat per gallon as compared to gas. This means that oil furnace units will cost less as compared to natural gas furnaces. However, you have to look at many other things apart from costs in order to make the right choice.

Here are a 3 important points that can help you in making up your mind as to whether oil or gas heater is right for your home.

1. Heating bills

When it comes to heating, natural gas furnaces are a clear winner. Gas had become a more affordable heat source as compared to oil. The average American homeowner paid about $728 to heat the home using gas furnace this winter, according to the Department of Energy Resources (DOER). In contrast, the cost of heating the home using oil has been a whopping $2,161. So, this means that you will save a lot in heating bills if you buy a gas furnace for your home.

2. Maintenance and care

While the upfront cost of oil furnaces is lower, they generally require more maintenance and care as compared to natural gas heaters. Gas furnaces, in contrast, require less upkeep and care. As a result, you will save on repair and maintenance costs when buying the oil heaters.

3. Emergency situations

When disaster strikes such as a leak in the main supply pipeline, you are more likely to shiver in the cold if you have a gas furnace as compared to an oil furnace. The reason is that oil furnace uses independent oil supply. You have more control over the supply with much lower chances of supply disruptions as compared to a natural gas.

Both oil and gas furnaces have pros and cons that you should consider before making a decision. After reading this article, you will have come to a definite conclusion as to which one is a better option to heat up your house.

Call ABC for more advice on a oil and gas furnace installation

Do you want to get in touch with a reliable furnace technician in the Bay Area? You can contact ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing. We have a team of highly experienced and professional technicians who can take care of all types of furnace installation and repair tasks.

5 Pitfalls To Avoid When Buying A New Furnace

5 Pitfalls to Avoid When Buying a New FurnaceBuying a new furnace is a major home purchase whose consequences will be felt for years to come.

That is why it’s essential that you shop smartly and avoid buying the wrong one for your home. And you can’t afford to make mistakes when thousands of dollars are at stake when buying a new furnace for the home.

While cost is a prime consideration when buying a new furnace, you should look at several other factors otherwise, you will end up losing money in the long run. The consequences of making a bad choice are many.

Here are 5 mistakes that you should avoid when buying a new furnace that can light your wallet on fire.

1. Focusing too much on costs

The most common mistake that you should avoid when buying a new furnace is to focus too much on the cost. A lower cost unit might seem a better deal as compared to a costly unit. However, in most cases, low cost also translates into less energy efficiency. This means that any amount that you save when buying a low-cost unit will be negated due to higher bills over the long term.

2. Buying a furnace with a low SEER rating

You must never overlook the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) when buying a new furnace. The SEER ratio tells about the efficiency with which the furnace heats up the room. Units that have a low SEER will result in substantially more energy bills as compared to those with a high SEER rating.

Ideally, you should buy a new furnace with a SEER rating of above 17. Avoid buying a unit with a rating below 12 as it can cost a lot in terms of high energy bills.

3. Overlooking rebate opportunities

Many manufacturers and states offer rebates on certain models. The rebates offered by the manufacturer can be as much as $1,000. That’s why you should always search online to find out whether the company offers rebates or discounts. However, again keep in mind that cost should not be your main focus and look at other aspects to ensure that you are getting the best bang for the bucks.

4. Selecting the wrong type of fuel

Keep in mind that not all furnaces use the same heating source. Some use methane (natural gas) while others use propane (LPG) or electricity. Generally, natural gas heaters are the most energy efficient option as compared to the others. However, you can’t use gas furnace unless you install a gas supply line. So, it’s important that you consider this option before paying for a new furnace.

5. Not scheduling maintenance for your new furnace

Maintenance contracts are necessary to ensure that your furnace performs without breaking down during the middle of the winter. You must ensure to sign up for an annual maintenance with a reputable furnace repair and maintenance company. Regular maintenance will ensure that the system performs without any major problems for a long time.

If you want to get in touch with experienced and reliable furnace repair and installation firm in the Bay Area, you can contact ABC Cooling, Heating & Plumbing.

5 Common Air Conditioner Problems

Your air conditioner is an essential appliance that keeps your home cool in the summer. A faulty air conditioning unit can cause a lot of inconvenience. The system must be serviced regularly to avoid a breakdown of the air conditioning unit.

5 Common Air Conditioner ProblemsWhile a lot of things can go wrong with the home air conditioner, a few air conditioner problems are relatively common. These problems, if not resolved quickly, can lead to a breakdown of the cooling device and the need for a replacement.

Here are 5 common air conditioner problems that must be addressed immediately by calling a professional technician for air conditioning repair.

1. Clogged Air Filter

The air filter prevents dust from entering the cooling device. Over time, the filter becomes clogged and must be cleaned by a skilled air conditioning professional. This is essential, as the clogged filter prevents optimal cooling. The filters need be cleaned about once a month, especially during the summers.

2. Your Fans Are Not Working

The fan prevents the compressor of the air conditioning unit from being heated up. The fan conveys the heat from the room to the outside. Sometimes, the fan does not work due to a mechanical problem. A faulty fan can trip the safety overload and may also damage the compressor unit.

That’s why it’s important that you regularly check the outside air conditioner fan regularly and have it serviced in case it’s not working.

3. Low Refrigerant Level

The refrigerant allows the air conditioner to generate cool air. A reduced refrigerant level prevents the device from properly cooling the air. In most cases, the refrigerant level is reduced due to a leak. A professional air conditioning technician can locate the leak and repair the problem.

4. Water Leak from the Air Conditioning Unit

A clogged condensate drain line can cause water to drip from the air conditioning unit. The drain line can become clogged with dirt, dust, mold, or sludge. The leaking water may result in ice building up over the coils.

The problem will also prevent proper cooling inside the house. You must call a professional technician to get the air conditioner serviced in the case of a water leakage problem.

5. Strange Noises from the Blower Motor

If you hear a screeching noise from the blower motor of the air conditioning unit, it indicates a major problem with the unit. Most likely, the issue is caused by a problem with the motor bearing or a damaged belt. In addition, a rattling, clanging, or banging noise may indicate a fault with the blower motor assembly.

If you hear any of these noises from the blower motor, you must immediately close the unit and call a professional technician to service the air conditioning unit.

Some final notes on air conditioner problems

Regular servicing of the air conditioning unit by a professional technician is important. An experienced technician can detect the problems and perform the appropriate repairs immediately.

To get in touch with a professional air conditioning technician in the Bay Area, give us a call at (510) 471-8181